The US-based entertainment company, American Films Inc., is now targeting ISPs and developers of VPN services. The firm has recently acquired the infamous “GuardaLey” copyright troll and the “Maker Information Services LLC” tactical data company, so it seems that they will execute full-scale attacks. American Films Inc. is opposed to ISPs and VPN providers because ISPs are presumed to help prevent piracy but they don’t, what’s worse, VPN providers are providing approaches to unblock websites for their users to access pirates easily and safely.

In purchasing Maker Data Services, American Films Inc. will now be offered a new ability to monitor file sharing practices from peer to peer. The company plans to compile all such information and then share it with the parties concerned. This is why they ask for copyright holders to join, as the driver for solving the problem must be from the collective powers of all shareholders. American Films Inc. also mentioned that they would invest all the Maker Data Services’ profits into developing new software services that concentrate on the copyright battle they face, and the development of the new software would allow them to collect electronic proof to support the legal process.   

While the American Films Inc. is making money from its sales to filmmakers, the filmmakers won legal fights and receive reimbursement from VPNs and ISPs. Once, we see the birth of a business model that relies heavily on trolling copyright. Nevertheless, the biggest difference this time is the evidence to support it and that is exactly where the hardest part of the entire system is. Highly technical matters will have to be resolved in the courts in dealing with a subject which is difficult to fully grasp so that there is a certain risk involved.

Fighting against VPN companies and ISPs sound way easier than they really are, so American Films Inc. is certainly going to have a lot to do. VPNs are an extraordinary and transformable target, so many analysts believe that what American Films Inc. is doing may eventually fail. Court judges have changed their position on copyright trolling long ago, so the company should pay attention to this point while at the same time proving its claims. This will be a hard trick to pull away.